The Acadia Center for English Immersion, located in beautiful Camden Maine. New Courses start every week.

Posts Tagged ‘English’

Video Tour of Camden, Maine

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014

Acadia Center excursion hiking on Mount Battie overlooking Camden, Maine, harbor, bay, and islands.Take a look at beautiful Camden, Maine, in this video by local photographer Josh Gerritsen. The tour begins with aerial views of the harbor and surrounding mountains, and continues with beautiful shots of village streets and small shops and restaurants, both in sunlight and after dark. Camden is home to Acadia Center, and we look forward to welcoming you here during your English immersion course this summer!

2014 English Immersion Courses Begin May 12

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

English immersion students on excursion in Camden, Maine.We’re excited to begin our English immersion courses in Camden, Maine, for the 2014 season!

New courses begin every Monday from May through October: mini-group classes (maximum 4 students with 1 teacher), private lessons, sharing our small-town community life, excursions, family-style meals with teachers – everything you need to improve your English rapidly.

Join us this spring, summer, or fall for a memorable learning vacation!Acadia Center for English Immersion students afloat in Camden harbor.English immersion students enjoying the view from Mt. Battie in Camden, Maine.

Maureen O’Keefe Joins English Course Faculty

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

Acadia Center is very pleased to welcome a new, highly experienced teacher to our English immersion course faculty.

Teacher Maureen O’Keefe, who has a master’s degree in Teaching of English as a Second Language and a University of Cambridge certificate in Teaching of English as a Foreign Language, spent 23 years living and teaching overseas before coming to live in midcoast Maine in 2003. In Oman she taught at the British Council, in Sri Lanka she was a teacher trainer and teacher at an English school, and in Peru she taught language arts to Peruvian students. In her spare time she gardens, dances, plays tennis,  and runs a small antique bead and jewelry business.

Sailing, Hiking Plus English Immersion Summer 2014

Friday, February 8th, 2013

Camden, Maine, and its environs offer one of the most popular destinations in the USA for summer sailing, as well as for hiking, kayaking, biking, and other outdoor sports.

During Acadia Center’s summer and fall English immersion courses – offered from May through October - twice-weekly excursions led by experienced teachers give students a chance to practice their English conversation in small groups while exploring Maine’s beautiful bays and mountains.

Register by January 15 for 5% Discount

Friday, November 23rd, 2012

Acadia Center English student at work in study center.We are excited to announce that our intensive English immersion courses in Camden, Maine, will start up again on May 6, 2013. Take advantage of the 5% early registration discount by registering before January 15.

Acadia Center English students on hike up Mount Battie in Camden, Maine.English immersion courses are offered from May through October. From November through April, sign up for online English lessons in conversation and/or writing.

We look forward to a great new season in 2013!

 

Dining and Day Trips in Midcoast Maine

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

According to the New York Times, Camden, Rockport, Rockland, Belfast, and surrounding towns are fantastic places to find restaurants offering local produce and unique dining experiences. Kayaking, sailing, and hiking excursions that are popular with Acadia Center English immersion students are also highlighted in the travel article published this week.

Register Now for $50/Week Discount

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

Register by April 30, 2012, to qualify for an Early Registration discount of $50 per week off the package price for all 2012 English immersion courses at Acadia Center in Camden, Maine, USA.

New English immersion courses begin every Monday from May through October in 2012. Join us in Maine this summer or fall!

Between You and Me: Grammar Conundrums

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Between you and me? Between you and I? Between me and you? Even native speakers of English confess to feeling perplexed when it comes to choosing the correct pronouns.

In his entertaining podcast Lexicon Valley on the online news website Slate, Mike Vuolo presents a satisfyingly thorough and often funny discussion of the confusion provoked by this expression.

Although most accept between you and me as the correct standard usage (following the rule of using the object pronoun, not the subject pronoun, after a preposition), champions of the form between you and I make the argument that if it was good enough for Shakespeare (in Merchant of Venice), it’s good enough for them.

Which one does singer Jessica Simpson favor? Listen for yourself.

Here is some vocabulary from the podcast that might, without explanation, stump (be too difficult for) even advanced students of English:

hypercorrection - a mistake in grammar caused by a false analogy with another rule that is commonly ignored

smartass – someone who is obnoxiously self-assertive and impudent

high dudgeon  – intense indignation

up for grabs – available to the first person who wants it or tries to get it

roll my eyes – express exasperation

persnickity – placing too much emphasis on trivial or minor details; fussy

cottage industry – a small, loosely organized flurry of activity or industry

from your lips to God’s ears - when used sarcastically, a pessimistic way of dismissing another’s naive hope

Early Registration Discount for 2012 English Immersion Courses

Monday, December 19th, 2011

Register by January 31, 2012, to qualify for a 5% Early Registration discount off the package price for all 2012 English immersion courses at Acadia Center in Camden, Maine, USA.

New English immersion courses begin every Monday from May through October in 2012.

Who vs. Whom: Which is Correct?

Sunday, May 22nd, 2011

Either as a relative pronoun or question word, whom is rarely used in conversation. Formal writing, yes, but ordinary conversation, no.

With whom did you go to the movies? is correct but sounds like a police interrogation.

Who did you go to the movies with? is technically incorrect but is the way we usually say it.

Is it better to be correct and absurdly formal, or incorrect and more accurate in mimicking native speakers, including the most educated? In ordinary conversation, generally speaking, the answer is you’re right to be wrong – use who.

Still, it’s a good idea to know which is correct in a given context. The quick test in choosing between who and whom is to substitute he or him. If he sounds better, who is correct; if him sounds right, whom is correct. That’s because as a pronoun whom is used to represent the object of either a verb or a preposition, while who represents the subject of a verb.

He is the consultant whom we contacted for advice. (We contacted him.)
To whom was the letter addressed? (The letter was addressed to him.)
He is the consultant who can answer your question. (He can answer your question.)

In the two examples above, the formality can be toned down by omitting the pronoun in the first, and using the more casual who in the second:
He is the consultant we contacted for advice.
Who was the letter addressed to?

The he/him test works well unless you’re confronted with a choice between whoever and whomever as in this sentence:
You can just talk with whoever/whomever answers the phone.

Even native English speakers get confused by this, because our instinct tells us that whom, not who, should follow the preposition with. However, there is another rule in English which dictates that every verb in a tense needs a subject. Here, whoever is the correct choice, since the verb answers needs a subject.

Might there be another situation when, besides addressing the Queen at a tea party, it makes sense to use whom as an object pronoun? If you see someone walking a dog, and the dog is so big and strong that it’s all its owner can do to keep up with it, you can ask, without risk of sounding ridiculously formal: Who is walking whom?