The Acadia Center for English Immersion, located in beautiful Camden Maine. New Courses start every week.

Posts Tagged ‘maine coast’

Lobstering in Maine

Monday, September 21st, 2015

Acadia Center English student holding a Maine lobster on the Lively Lady tour in Camden.A trip to Maine is not complete without a freshly steamed lobster dinner. And one of the many ways that Acadia Center for English Immersion students get to know more about life in our small town community on Maine’s rocky coast is by learning about lobsters and lobster fishing.

One popular excursion is to the museum at Marshall Point in Port Clyde and the Port Clyde lobster buoy exhibit at Marshall Point Lighthouse museum.lighthouse made famous by Tom Hanks in the film Forest Gump.

In summer, students also take a cruise on the M/V Lively Lady out of our home port of Camden, and see what it’s like to haul a lobster trap.

Not the way to eat a lobster...Check out the current issue of The Maine Thing Quarterly for an in-depth look at lobstering today, including an interview with a lobster fisherman.


Carried Away: What does it mean?

Saturday, May 26th, 2012

In a recent New York Times interview, iconic American writer and radio host Garrison Keillor was asked: Have you ever felt carried away by a particular place in America? The phrasal verb carried away, used in the passive with the verbs be, feel, or get, means delighted and enraptured, and can also imply getting a little over-excited and out-of-control. For Keillor, the most intoxicating places in the USA include the Grand Canyon, the back roads of rural Tennessee, the High Plains of North Dakota, and the coastline of Maine.

Carried away, in its possible sense of emotion getting the better of reason, can also carry a more negative meaning, as in this quote from the Catholic writer and mystic Thomas Merton.

The idiom swept away has a similar meaning to carried away, with perhaps a dash more vigor. It appears in one of the best (and longest) movie titles ever, Swept Away by an Unusual Destiny in the Blue Sea of August – the English translation of the Italian title of Lina Wertmuller’s 1974 film and shortened to just Swept Away in the 2002 remake starring Madonna.